Festival Highlights

Kinshasa Symphony Orchestra | Screening & Live Performance!

Posted by on Aug 17, 2014 in Festival Highlights, News, Screenings

Kinshasa Symphony Orchestra | Screening & Live Performance!

Dir: Claus Wischmann /Martin Baer,  DRCongo/Germany,  2010,  Subtitled, (PG) Two hundred orchestral musicians are playing Beethoven’s Ninth when a power cut strikes a few bars before the last movement – this is the least of the worries facing the only symphony orchestra in Congo. In 15 years of existence, they have survived two putsches, immense shortages, and a war. A captivating study of people in one of the world’s most chaotic cities doing their best to maintain one of the most complex systems of human endeavour: a symphony orchestra. A gorgeous, inspiring testimony to the healing joy of music.     The Watershed, Sunday 14th September 2014, 15:00 We are thrilled to screen this landmark documentary for a second time in partnership with Watershed. Further, in partnership with Colston Hall, we are excited to welcome the Kinshasa Symphony Orchestra for a concert of orchestral and choral music in collaboration with musicians from London Southbank Centre’s resident and associate orchestras and members of Bristol Choral Society.   LIVE performance Colston Hall, Tuesday 16th September 2014, 19:30   The Kinshasa Symphony Orchestra is Central Africa’s only symphony orchestra and the world’s first all black symphony orchestra. Established in the mid-1990s by their conductor and musical director Armand Diangienda, theirs is an inspirational story of creating an orchestra from scratch against great odds, and demonstrates the tremendous power of music and the joy it brings to people’s lives. All of the musicians are self-taught. At present, the orchestra numbers 60-100 and support a 100-strong choir. Some of the works to be performed include:   Berlioz   Symphonie Fantastique (movements from) Sibelius Finlandia Beethoven Symphony No.9 Choral Symphony (final movement) In the traditional Congolese Repertoire: 1. Nkolo na biso ( Our Lord) 2. Eh Nziamè (My God) 3. Mvuluzi wutukidi (the savior is born) 4. Mpungia Nsuka (Last Trumpet)     SPECIAL OFFER: Show your concert ticket at the Watershed Box Office and receive £1 off your ticket for the screening or bring your cinema ticket to Colston Hall to get £1 off your concert ticket. Buy Tickets for the film screening HERE and for the live performance HERE....

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Pop Up Screening: Stone Street

Posted by on Nov 3, 2013 in Bulletins, Festival Highlights

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Belonging

Posted by on Nov 3, 2013 in Bulletins, Festival Highlights

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Yema (Sat, Nov 9)

Posted by on Oct 30, 2013 in Festival Highlights

Yema (Sat, Nov 9)

WATCH TRAILER Director: Djamila Sahraoui YEMA (source: VARIETY) Algeria’s fratricidal battle between the government and fundamentalists is played at the micro level in Djamila Sahraoui’s three-hander “Yema.” Designed as a Greek tragedy, the telegraphic story is set in a stunning landscape where a mother grieves for her soldier son, killed by Islamic insurgents affiliated with his brother. Beautifully lensed by Raphael O’Byrne (“The Portuguese Nun”), “Yema” (meaning “mother”) has all the trappings of the ancient classics, yet feels equally antiquated; it’s worthy without transcending a static iconicism. Minimal fest play will accompany streaming. Like a grieving Virgin Mary, Ouardia (helmer-scripter Sahraoui, “Barakat!”) prepares her son Tarek’s body for burial. She’s confined to her home and environs by a one-handed guard (Samir Yahia), taking orders from his superior (Ali Zarif). Gradually it’s revealed that the superior is Ouardia’s younger son, a mujahideen fighter she blames for Tarek’s death. The younger brother also stole the elder’s wife, further embittering their disconsolate mother. Everyone is wounded emotionally and physically by the country’s conflicts, and only Ouardia’s dogged cultivation of her garden produces life from the parched soil. Visuals further the sense of an epic tale recounted on a human...

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One Man’s Show (Sat, Nov 9)

Posted by on Oct 30, 2013 in Festival Highlights

One Man’s Show (Sat, Nov 9)

WATCH TRAILER ONE MAN’S SHOW ONE MAN’S SHOW by Newton Aduaka is the latest film by this celebrated young director since his 2007 award wining film EZRA. EZRA was the first film to give an African perspective on the disturbing phenomenon of the abduction of child soldiers into Africa’s civil wars. This prize winning film was a great piece of directorial and storytelling excellence. Fans all over the world as well as critics have waited for Newton’s follow up film for many years and not in vain: ONE MAN’S SHOW was awarded the prestigious international critics’ prize (FIPRESCI) at FESPACO this year. A France that is searching for its own identity forms the backdrop to ONE MAN’S SHOW, a fictional portrait of an actor who, on the eve of his fiftieth birthday, finds out he has cancer of the stomach. In his existential torment he tries to reassemble the crumbs of his shattered ego, settle things with his young son and confront the end of his love affairs with the three women who have shared his life. A brave and brilliant film.  ...

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Death Metal Angola (Sat, Nov 9)

Posted by on Oct 30, 2013 in Festival Highlights

Death Metal Angola (Sat, Nov 9)

WATCH TRAILER Director: Jeremy Kido DEATH METAL ANGOLA Following nearly 40 years of unrelenting war – with every attendant horror – peace and reconstruction are slowly arriving to Angola. Damaged first by the war for independence from Portugal, Angola was then ripped apart by a devastating civil war that orphaned thousands of children. Huambo, Angola’s second largest city, finds 55 of these children in the Okutiuka orphanage under the care of Sonia Ferreira. Sonia’s boyfriend, Wilker Flores, is a death metal guitarist who uses the brutal sounds and rhythms of this hardcore music as a path to healing, or, as Sonia says, “to clear out the debris from all these years of war.” DEATH METAL ANGOLA tracks Wilker and Sonia’s dream – to stage Angola’s first-ever national rock concert, bringing together members from different strands of the Angolan hardcore scene from different provinces – as it unfolds in fits and starts against the bombed out and mined backdrop of the formerly stately Huambo. Rubble and deconstructed spaces provide scenic reminders of why hardcore music has gained a foothold. What initially looks like a Quixotic undertaking gains momentum, aided by social media and propelled by members of the various branches of the death metal hardcore underground, who join together to stage the event. Raucous and righteous, DMA’s look at a rock show off the grid is fulfilling, haunting, and...

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